A wonderful birth story from the reversed perspective

So many influential traditional birth stories and myths are told depicting the mother as a container, a vessel, from which a special person was born. The emphasis in these stories lies on the latter person, and his importance can often be considered as the reason for the myth. Yet these same stories can be turned around, allowing them to become powerful stories in which women’s experiences through the ages can be expressed. Here is a link to a wonderful reversed story of the birth of the child Siddharta, who would grow up to become the Buddha, retold, this time including, not excluding, what makes up the experience of a birth-giving mother.

Postpartum despair epidemic

One of many examples of how women who recently gave birth are not receiving support, neither given recognition nor adequate care, left by themselves in this entire new and very vulnerable state, as other tasks, roles and positions have higher priority in the way that Western society is organized. This is mean in itself, as stated in this article, but it is also mean how an apparant and most expensive solution is quickly given entrance into the market: a new drug. This article speaks of the US, but postpartum depression is not only underrecognized there. Alternatives from which women around the globe would benefit include TLC, personal support, longer leave, flexibility and suitable accommodations for breast-feeding when a mother returns to work. Cheaper, more substantial. However, it takes a different kind of world, one that puts care central.

Women’s traumatic childbirth experiences

New research concerning maternity. Women’s traumatic childbirth experiences in the Netherlands shows that maternity care needs improvement. Women are too often neglected, not asked for consent, etc. Even when care is given with the best intentions, professionals may harm women during childbirth and cause trauma. Women-centred care is one of the options to improve care, according to the authors.